Tuesday, April 26, 2016

New SDK for Python Adapters

Our family of Adapter Development Kits has been further enriched with the Lightstreamer SDK For Python Adapters, which lets developers write Remote Adapter Sets exploiting the power and flexibility of Python, one of the most widely used general purpose high-level languages.

The new SDK has been developed keeping in mind the same principles and concepts which drove the design and implementation of the SDK for .NET Adapters, the "progenitor" of the successive SDKs for Java Remote Adapters and for Node.js Adapters, all already provided as part of the Lightstreamer distribution. Nevertheless, the Python Adapter SDK must not be considered as a "simple" port to the Python language; on the contrary, it is a brand new implementation, based on the best practices and widespread conventions promoted by the community around the language.

In this post we are going to show a general overview about the development of custom Python Remote Adapter Sets, which should sound quite familiar for those who have already experimented with the others Lightstreamer Adapter SDKs.

Wednesday, April 13, 2016

Dockerizing Lightstreamer


Containerization is one of the most important IT trends over the last two years. Docker heads this technology up, providing an open platform which lets you package up applications with all their dependencies. Applications can be shipped as software containers to enable process isolation, resources optimization, portability, and ease of maintainability and deployment.

As passionate about each new exciting and promising technology, we at Lightstreamer could not miss the opportunity to enter this world, so we tested how well our Server could be "dockerized" and ... Yes, we did it! We published the Docker official image for Lightsteamer Server on Docker Hub.

The aim of this blog post is to show how to use our Docker image as a starting point to build new Lightstreamer Server deployments.

Monday, April 11, 2016

React Native Demo Available

In the past few years, we have seen the diffusion of frameworks like PhoneGap and Titanium, which offer developers the opportunity of building mobile applications using web technologies. The outcome is called a hybrid app.

Web developers can use their skills for mobile development and in addition they can use the same codebase with little changes for multiple platforms - what became known as “Write once, run everywhere”. On the downside, some of these frameworks wrap your JavaScript code in a web view: this results in UI elements that don’t have a native look and feel and fall short when it comes to performance (you are still writing a web app).